Home Advertise Contact Blog Advertiser Login RSS
Newsletter Signup

Buy A Business Opportunity of Franchise
Home-Based Businesses
Choosing a Business Opportunity Growth and Profit Marketing and Sales
Plans and Goals Running Your Own Business Start-Up
Working From Home Entrepreneur Exchange Feature Articles
Opportunity Community Opportunity Focus In The News
Come Read Our Featured Articles About Business Opportunities, Franchising, Business Opportunity News and More
..an excerpt from an article by Lauren Diethelm on Fundera. Halfaker...
A Small Business Success Story. MyCorporation.com & CorpNet, founded by Nellie Alkap ...an excerpt from an article by Lauren Diethelm on Fundera. Nellie...

Sponsors

I-insureme
$$$ BUILD HUGE INCOME SELLING SOMETHING EVERYONE MUST HAVE $$$ Call our 24-hour message line at 301-276-5575 now!
Carelumina
Make up to $1,000/week! We are changing the industry with our physician formulated state-of-the-art products & services!
CTFO
TAKE A FREE POSITION NOW WITH CTFO SELLING CBD HEMP OIL! Join The Hottest Wellness Trend & Next Billion Dollar Industry.
Home-Based Travel Business Making $$$$
Cash in with us on the Multi-Trillion Dollar Travel Industry by working as an independent Affiliate for World Discovery!
 
Resource Center > Article
Innovation Accounting: A Necessary Part of Any “Lean Startup”
1 Nov 11 Posted by: Kathleen C Lanza
in Start-Up
Share this Article:

In his recently released New York Times bestseller, “The Lean Start-up,” entrepreneur and master business start-up blogger Eric Ries lays out a host of business strategies that have caught the nationwide attention of prospective and current business owners alike.  The basic supposition of Ries’ book is that the success rate for innovative entrepreneurial endeavors can be improved by following his five Lean Start-up principles, one of which is “innovation accounting.”

According to Ries, among the most dangerous moves any business start-up can make is persevering for far too long, all in the name of that most stalwart of entrepreneurial traits―optimism.  Although there are exemplary tales of hugely successful business people who have risen above what were thought to be extremely grim odds, the tales of others in the same boat who led their companies into abject failure are far more common.

The Lean Startup

One of the reasons Ries cites for this sobering fact is that the more long-term projections of any traditional business plan, although helpful, are not realistic.  They oftentimes don’t accurately reflect or allow for the inherent turbulence that any start-up encounters, especially in its earliest days.

A start-up requires a degree of fluidity early on that is not conducive to a rigidly constructed and more standard approach, according to Ries.  This perspective is supported by his definition of a start-up’s job―“to (1) rigorously measure where it (thestartup) is right now, confronting the hard truths that assessment reveals, and then (2) devise experiments to learn how to move the real numbers closer to the ideal reflected in the business plan.”

While standard accounting policies and procedures are an integral part of any successful business, particularly larger corporations, they are not necessarily beneficial in evaluating entrepreneurial endeavors, especially early on.  That’s where Ries’ concept of innovation accounting comes in.

Many business owners deem the ongoing modification of their products and services coupled with rising numbers as a solid measure of progress, according to Ries. He says that’s just not good enough and encourages entrepreneurs to ask themselves two very important questions in this regard:  “How do we know that the changes we’ve made are related to the results we’re seeing?” and “More important, how do we know that we are drawing the right lessons from those changes?”

Innovation accounting, Ries says, allows for this more in-depth level of analysis.  It takes into account the “disruptive innovation” that is an inherent part of any start-up.  By implementing the three basic steps to innovation accounting set forth in Ries’ book, start-up entrepreneurs can prove objectively that they are growing what will become a sustainable operation.  Furthermore, they are able to turn what would once be considered faithful assumptions into a quantitative financial model, one that supports accountability even when the model changes.

According to Ries, innovation accounting works in three basic steps:

1)  It uses a minimal viable product (MVP) to establish real data on where the company stands at any
given juncture.  An MVP is the fastest way to establish a customer feedback loop with minimal output of effort, Ries
says.  Its primary goal is to test fundamental business hypotheses without having to perfect the product or service in question too prematurely.

2)  Using the MVP, start-ups, through many attempts, move from the baseline to the ideal, when the company then reaches a decision point.

3)  At this juncture, a company is either making solid progress toward the ideal enough that it makes sense to continue, or persevere.  If not, the strategy must be deemed flawed and in need of serious change―or as Ries labels it, a pivot, which starts the process all over again and in a more productive fashion than before.

If you are a home-based or other small business opportunity or franchise owner or start-up entrepreneur and want more in-depth information on innovation accounting and The Lean Start-up’s other key principles, visit http://theleanstartup.com/ today.

 

Related Blog Posts
29 Dec 18 Posted by: Todd Hatch
in Start-Up
When starting a new business, every business owner is going to make mistakes. It's simply part of the learning process. But knowing ahead of time which mistakes not to make can save time, money and frustration. Carrie Smith discusses
14 Dec 18 Posted by: Todd Hatch
in Start-Up
Are you thinking about starting your own business? This info from Ryan Robinson's article on his website, www.ryob.com,...
9 Dec 18 Posted by: Todd Hatch
in Start-Up
Did you know that women-owned businesses are eligible for grants that are not available to other business owners? Receiving a grant is probably the best way to get funding for a business because, unlike a business loan,...
9 Dec 18 Posted by: Todd Hatch
in Start-Up
Starting a new business is usually an exciting time for every entrepreneur. But just diving into a new venture without planning can be a disaster. An article from
5 Dec 18 Posted by: Todd Hatch
in Start-Up
Every tech entrepreneur that starts a business has the same primary goal in mind. And getting there as fast as possible is understandably important. But 3 mistakes can kill a tech startup's ability to succeed. In her article on...
 
   
Entrepreneur's Source for Everything Business Opportunity and Franchise Related
..an excerpt from an article by Lauren Diethelm on Fundera. Halfaker...
Read More


Premium Sponsor